NASA Image of the Day (Large)

Inges Aerospace Visora A Antioquia-Colombia

Antioquia-Colombia Como la Mas Educada en Ciencia, Ingeniería, Tecnológía, Innovación, Educación, Creatividad, Emprendimiento e Industria AeroEspacial Es un Estilo y Una Forma de Vida

sábado, 30 de mayo de 2009

NASA TV's This Week @NASA, May 29





This Week At NASA...
SPIRIT’S SANDY STATUS – JPL

In a testing facility at the Jet Propulsion Lab, NASA's rover project team continues to develop the best maneuvers for getting the Spirit rover rolling again

John Callas: "We have a test rover which is identical to Spirit and Opportunity here in a lab at JPL; it's in a sand box. What we're going to do is landscape the sand box here at JPL to be just like the location where Spirit is on Mars. We're going to imbed the engineering rover in the soil the same way Spirit is imbedded and we’re going to try to match the soil to what we think the soil is like on Mars and then practice getting out."

Spirit has been stuck in soft Martian soil for more than three weeks. Engineers at the Jet Propulsion Lab had decided to suspend driving the vehicle after its left middle wheel stalled and other wheels had dug themselves in about hub-deep.

The rover's team also fears its belly may have been lowered enough to get hung up on a small mound of rocks. Engineers are using Spirit's twin, Opportunity, to see whether the microscopic imager camera mounted on the end of each rover's arm could inspect under the vehicle and help provide a solution. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is also helping by relaying imaging data taken by Spirit of the soil and its surroundings. Both rovers have been exploring the Red Planet for almost 5-and-a-half years.

John Callas: "The good news is that Opportunity has been driving and driving towards the south so then it will eventually turn toward the east. It recently passed ten miles of odometry which is an important milestone."

GOOD VIBRATIONS – DFRC


Engineers at the Dryden Flight Research Center have completed acoustic tests on the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle's test module. Conducted in the weight and balance hangar at Edwards Air Force Base, the high-decibel testing generates mathematical models of how sound vibrations affect the structural integrity of the capsule, as well as its internal electronics. The sound testing reached 135 decibels: louder than a rock concert and equivalent to what you'd hear standing 100 feet from a jet engine at full throttle. The module will be used in an Orion launch pad abort systems test later this year.

ASTEROIDS ACCELERATED LIFE? - HQ

A massive asteroid bombardment nearly 4 billion years ago may have actually boosted life on Earth. A NASA-funded study by the University of Colorado indicates that during this cataclysmic, multi-million year event called the Late Heavy Bombardment, or LHB, the asteroids, some the size of Kansas, might have generated enough heat to sterilize Earth's surface. But the study's authors believe that microbes living underground and underwater almost certainly would have survived. These relatively "meek" microbes would then have emerged from their subsurface existence to inherit the Earth's land and oceans

Dr. Michael: "No matter how large an asteroid that hits the earth is, unless it's the size of say Mars, something as big as Kansas even, will not destroy all life on earth. Now the life that remains might well be bacteria, nothing that you or I would recognize as kin, but there will be life on earth. It says something about how robust life on earth is against these cosmic catastrophes."

TWO IN A ROW! - LaRC


NASA's Aviation Safety Program is among the winners of the prestigious Robert J. Collier Trophy. The Commercial Aviation Safety Team, CAST, an interagency consortium of which NASA is a member, was recognized by the National Aeronautics Association for its work in commercial aviation safety. Researchers at four NASA Centers -- Langley, Ames, Dryden and Glenn -- contribute to the Agency's Aviation Safety Program that develops advanced, affordable technologies to make flying safer. This is the second year in a row that a NASA team is sharing this award.

Doug Rohn: "The accident rate has always been low. Aviation is a safe form of transportation but to make it even lower that's quite an accomplishment."

Statistics show that 2008 was the safest year yet for commercial aviation.

CURIOSITY - HQ


Clara Ma Sot: "I heard my mom saying, well that’s wonderful, and she was really excited."

And we have a winner! 12-year-old Clara Ma of Lenexa, Kansas is the designated champion of the rover-naming contest. Her entry, "Curiosity," was selected from 9,000 names sent via the Internet during a nationwide student contest and will now be the official moniker of NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory.

Clara Ma: "I chose that name because I was really curious about space and our planets and our solar system, and I wanted to learn more about it."

NASA selected the winner based on the name preferences of the Mars Science Project leaders and the quality of student essays.

Clara Ma: "Curiosity is the passion that drives us through our everyday lives. We have become explorers and scientists with our need to ask questions and to wonder."

The naming contest was conducted in partnership with Disney-Pixar's WALL-E. More than 65,000 votes were cast worldwide. Ma wins a trip to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, where she'll be invited to sign her name directly onto the rover as its being assembled.

The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in the fall of 2011 and will be larger and more capable than any craft previously sent to land on the Red Planet.

Clara Ma: "We will never know everything there is to know, but with our burning Curiosity we have learned so much."

And that's This Week At NASA!

For more on these and other stories, log onto : www.nasa.gov

viernes, 29 de mayo de 2009

Acople de la Soyuz con la ISS

La tripulación de la Estación Espacial Internacional estaba a la espera de la llegada de los tres nuevos miembros que inauguraría una era de una tripulación de seis personas a bordo del laboratorio orbital. El cosmonauta ruso Román Romanenko, El Astronauta de la Agencia Espacial Europea Frank De Winne y el Astronauta de la Agencia Espacial Canadiense Bob Thirsk lanzados a bordo de una nave espacial Soyuz el miércoles 27 de mayo de 2009 por la mañana desde el cosmódromo de Baikonur en Kazajstán.





La Soyuz estaba prevista para acoplarse con la estación a las 8:36 am GMT Viernes, 29 de mayo. El trío se unirá al Comandante de la Estación Gennady Padalka y a los Ingenieros de Vuelo Mike Barratt de la NASA y Koichi Wakata de la Agencia de Exploración Aeroespacial del Japón (JAXA) para formar la tripulación de la Expedición 20. Esto marcará por primera vez que las cinco Agencias Asociadas estén representadas por los astronautas en la estación al mismo tiempo.




Image above: The Expedition 20 crew holds a welcome ceremony in the Zvezda service module. Credit: NASA TV
Three new crew members arrived at the International Space Station at 8:34 a.m. EDT Friday. After launching from Kazakhstan on Wednesday, flight engineers Roman Romanenko, Robert Thirsk and Frank De Winne spent two days in space aboard the Soyuz TMA-15 spacecraft before docking to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya module.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/index.html















European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Frank De Winne, Expedition 20 flight engineer and Expedition 21 commander; cosmonaut Roman Romanenko and Canadian Space Agency astronaut Robert Thirsk, both Ex...
European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Frank De Winne, Expedition 20 flight engineer and Expedition 21 commander; cosmonaut Roman Romanenko and Canadian Space Agency astronaut Robert Thirsk, both Expedition 20/21 flight engineers participated in traditional ceremonies at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, outside Moscow.













jueves, 28 de mayo de 2009

Buscando Sitios de Aterrizaje para el Laboratorio Científico de Marte

En cuanto a los sitios de aterrizaje para el Laboratorio de Ciencia de Marte

Rich Zurek: La responsabilidad principal del Orbitador de Reconocimiento de Marte- Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter ha sido la de buscar nuevos lugares de aterrizaje para futuras misiones. Tanto para encontrar lugares que son científicamente interesante del planeta, que tienen un gran potencial para el futuro descubrimiento una vez que aterricemos allí, sino también para asegurarse y certificar que seremos capaces de aterrizar (amartizar)en forma segura. Lo siguiente es que el Laboratorio de Ciencia de Marte, serà lanzado en el 2011. Este aterrizará en el planeta en 2012. Más de 3 docenas de sitios han sido intensamente estudiados por el Orbitador de Reconocimiento de Marte, y de que sitios de aterrizaje final han surgido.
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/podcasting/jpl-mroland20090527.html





miércoles, 27 de mayo de 2009

Despega la Expedición 20


Los ingenieros de vuelo Roman Romanenko, Frank De Winne y Robert Thirsk de la 20 ª Tripulación de la Estación Espacial Internacional lanzada en su Soyuz TMA-15 desde el Cosmódromo de Baikonur en Kazajstán a las 6:34 am EDT Miércoles, 27 de mayo de 2009, para comenzar un período de estancia de seis meses en el espacio.

La Expedición 20 marcará el inicio de operaciones de tripulaciones de seis personas a bordo de la Estación Espacial Internacional. Los cinco socios de los organismos internacionales - la NASA, la Agencia Espacial Federal Rusa, la Agencia de Exploración Aeroespacial del Japón, la Agencia Espacial Europea y la Agencia Espacial Canadiense - estarán representadas en órbita por primera vez.

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1374.html




Partiendo Hacia el Montículo 'Von Braun'



El explorador de Marte, el Spirit de la NASA utilizó su cámara de navegación para tomar esta imagen del terreno hacia el sureste de la localización alcanzada por el Espirit en el día o sol Marciano 1871, de su misión (8 de abril de 2009).

El montículo en el horizonte en la parte superior izquierda es llamado informalmente "Von Braun" y es una de las características que el equipo del rover ha designado como posible sitio de investigación en los meses futuros. Desde el lugar donde estaba el Spirit cuando la imagen fue tomada, Von Braun está aproximadamente a 525 pies, o 160 metros de distancia.
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1373.html






STATUS REPORT : STS-125-27

Sunday, May 24, 2009 - 11:30 a.m. CDT
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas05.24.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-27
STS-125 MCC Status Report #27


Space shuttle Atlantis and its seven-member crew landed at 10:39 a.m. CDT Sunday at Edwards Air Force Base in California, capping off a nearly 13-day mission to repair and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope. Atlantis’ astronauts conducted five spacewalks during their STS-125 mission to extend the life of the orbiting observatory.

Mission managers waved off landing at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida this morning, the shuttle’s primary landing site. Dynamic weather conditions around the Shuttle Landing Facility prevented Atlantis from attempting either of the two opportunities for Kennedy, and the shuttle was diverted to Edwards.

Atlantis’ main landing gear touched down at 10:39:05 a.m., followed by the nose gear at 10:39:15 a.m. The shuttle’s wheels stopped at 10:40:15 a.m., bringing the mission’s elapsed time to 12 days, 21 hours, 37 minutes, 9 seconds. Atlantis traveled 5.3 million miles during its journey.

Commander Scott Altman, Pilot Gregory C. Johnson and Mission Specialists Michael Good, Megan McArthur, John Grunsfeld, Andrew Feustel and Mike Massimino successfully installed two new instruments and repaired two others, bringing them back to life, replaced gyroscopes and batteries, and added new thermal insulation panels to protect the orbiting observatory. The result is six working, complementary science instruments with capabilities beyond what was available and an extended operational lifespan until at least 2014.

With the newly installed Wide Field Camera, Hubble will be able to observe in ultraviolet and infrared spectrums as well as visible light, peer deep onto the cosmic frontier in search of the earliest star systems and study planets in the solar system. The telescope’s new Cosmic Origins Spectrograph will allow it to study the grand-scale structure of the universe, including the star-driven chemical evolution that produce carbon and the other elements necessary for life.

Hubble’s greatest scientific accomplishments include determining the age of the universe – 13.7 billion years – and discovering that virtually all major galaxies have a super massive black hole.

Atlantis’ crew is scheduled to return home to its Houston base on Tuesday, arriving at Ellington Field’s Hangar 990 about 4 p.m. The public is invited to the ceremony.

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-26

Sunday, May 24, 2009 - 12:30 a.m. CDT
Mission Control Center,
Houston, Texas05.24.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-26
STS-125 MCC Status Report #26


Atlantis’ crew is again preparing for landing today as mission managers continue to monitor the weather in Florida and California. The crew woke up this morning at 12:01 a.m. CDT to “The Ride of the Valkyries,” composed by Richard Wagner. It was played for the entire crew.

For the first opportunity in Florida at Kennedy Space Center, the crew would execute a deorbit burn at 7:57 a.m. and land at 9:09 a.m. The second Kennedy opportunity calls for a deorbit burn at 9:41 a.m. and landing at 10:48 a.m.

The first landing opportunity at Edwards Air Force Base would start with a deorbit burn at 9:24 a.m. and culminate in a 10:38 a.m. landing. The second opportunity would begin with a deorbit burn at 11:07 a.m. and result in landing at 12:17 p.m.

The Kennedy weather forecast is expected to improve slightly, but there is a chance that weather in the vicinity of the Shuttle Landing Facility will continue to be unfavorable. The Edwards forecast is generally favorable.

The next status report will be issued after landing today or at the end of the crew’s day if landing is waved off.

martes, 26 de mayo de 2009

Llegando a Casa



Personal de tierra comienza el remolque del transbordador espacial Atlantis de la pista principal en la Base Edwards de la Fuerza Aérea despúes de su aterrizaj el 24 de mayo de 2009, el cual concluyó la misión STS-125 para la actualización del Telescopio Espacial Hubble.

Image Credit: NASA / Tony Landis

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1372.html

Un regreso triunfal



La tripulación del transbordador espacial Atlantis se reunieron en la pista de Base Edwards de la Fuerza Aérea en la conclusión con éxito de la misión STS-125 para mejorar el telescopio espacial Hubble, que duró 13 días. De izquierda a derecha son Mike Massimino, Greg Johnson, el comandante de la misión Scott Altman misión, Megan McArthur, John Grunsfeld, Andrew Feustel y Michael Good.

Image Credit: NASA / Tony Landis




domingo, 24 de mayo de 2009

Aterrizaje del Transbordador Espacial Atlantis


http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/271560main_land-chute.jpg



Transbordador espacial Atlantis ha aterrizado con seguridad después de un gran exitosa misión para el mejoramiento del Telescopio Espacial Hubble. La tripulación realizó cinco EVAs (Caminatas Espaciales) para reparar dos instrumentos, instalar dos nuevos, sustituir todas las seis baterías y giroscopios, reemplazar un Sensor de Orientación fina, e instalar tres Capas de Mantas Exteriores Nuevas - New Outer Blanket Layers (NOBLs). El Hubble esta ahora mejor que nunca. Felicitaciones para todos en una maravillosa misión.
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/servicing/SM4/main/index.html



STATUS REPORT : STS-125-25

8:30 a.m. CDT Saturday, May 23, 2009
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas
05.23.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-25
STS-125 MCC Status Report #25


Weather in Florida did not cooperate again for Atlantis’ return to Earth today. There are two additional landing opportunities being considered Sunday on both U.S. coasts.

For the first opportunity in Florida at Kennedy Space Center, the crew would execute a deorbit burn at 7:58 a.m. and land at 9:11 a.m. The second Kennedy opportunity calls for a deorbit burn at 9:31 a.m. and landing at 10:49 a.m.

The first landing opportunity targeted in California at Edwards Air Force Base would start with a deorbit burn at 9:25 a.m. and culminate in a 10:40 a.m. landing. The second opportunity would begin with a deorbit burn at 11:08 a.m. and result in landing at 12:19 p.m.

The Kennedy weather forecast is expected to improve slightly, but there is a chance that weather in the vicinity of the Shuttle Landing Facility will continue to be unfavorable. The Edwards forecast is generally favorable.

The crew is scheduled to go to sleep at 4:01 p.m. and awaken at 12:01 a.m. Sunday. The next status report will be issued after landing or earlier if events warrant.

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-24

12:30 a.m. CDT Saturday, May 23, 2009
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas
05.23.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-24
STS-125 MCC Status Report #24


After the weather in Florida prevented Atlantis from landing yesterday, the crew is readying for another attempt today. The crew woke up at 12:01 a.m. CDT to “Where My Heart Will Take Me” performed by Russell Watson. It was played for the entire crew.

There are three landing opportunities available for Atlantis at both Kennedy and Edwards today. The Kennedy weather forecast is expected to improve somewhat, but there is a chance that weather in the vicinity of the Shuttle Landing Facility will be unfavorable. The Edwards forecast is generally favorable for all three opportunities.

Landing preparations will begin at 3 a.m. The closing of the payload bay doors is scheduled to occur at 4:22 a.m.

For the first Kennedy opportunity, the crew would execute a deorbit burn at 7:01 a.m. and land at 8:15 a.m. The second Kennedy opportunity calls for a deorbit burn at 8:45 a.m. and landing at 9:54 a.m. The third Florida opportunity would begin with a deorbit burn at 10:29 a.m. and result in landing at 11:33 a.m.

The first California landing opportunity would start with a deorbit burn at 8:29 a.m., and result in landing at 9:45 a.m. The second Edwards opportunity would begin with a deorbit burn at 10:11 a.m. and culminate in an 11:23 a.m. landing. The third opportunity would require a deorbit burn at 11:55 a.m. and end with landing at 1:02 p.m.

The next status report will be issued after landing today or at the end of the crew’s day if landing is waived off.

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-23

4:30 p.m. CDT Friday, May 22, 2009
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas
05.22.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-23
STS-125 MCC Status Report #23


Thunderstorms, low clouds and showers prevented Atlantis’ astronauts from landing today at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The crew was waved off from its second and final Friday landing attempt about 7 a.m. CDT, when Mission Control sent word that the weather was too unstable to permit a safe landing.

Shortly after the weather wave off, Entry Flight Director Norm Knight called up support for the backup landing site Saturday at Edwards Air Force Base.

There are three landing opportunities available for Atlantis at both Kennedy and Edwards on Saturday. The Kennedy weather forecast is expected to improve somewhat, but there is a good chance weather in the vicinity of the Shuttle Landing Facility will be unfavorable. The Edwards forecast is generally favorable for all three opportunities.

The crew will awaken at 12:01 a.m. CDT, and resume landing preparations at 3 a.m. For the first landing opportunity Saturday, the crew would close the payload bay doors at 4:22 a.m.

For the first Kennedy opportunity, the crew would execute a deorbit burn at 7:01 a.m. and land at 8:15 a.m. The second Kennedy opportunity calls for a deorbit burn at 8:45 a.m. and landing at 9:54 a.m. The third Florida opportunity would begin with a deorbit burn at 10:29 a.m. and result in landing at 11:33 a.m.

The first California landing opportunity would start with a deorbit burn at 8:29 a.m., and result in landing at 9:45 a.m. The second Edwards opportunity would begin with a deorbit burn at 10:11 a.m. and culminate in an 11:23 a.m. landing. The third opportunity would require a deorbit burn at 11:55 a.m. and end with landing at 1:02 p.m.

The crew officially began its sleep shift tonight at 4:01 p.m. today. The next status report will be issued at the beginning of the crew’s day or earlier if events warrant.

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-22

1:30 a.m. CDT Friday, May 22, 2009
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas
05.22.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-22
STS-125 MCC Status Report #22


The crew of Atlantis is making preparations on board the shuttle this morning for the first of two landing attempts at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The crew woke up this morning at 1:01 a.m. CDT to “The Galaxy Song” from “Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life.” It was played for the entire crew.

Mission managers continue to monitor the weather in Florida for today’s landing. There is a low pressure system in the Gulf of Mexico that is causing rain and thunderstorms around Kennedy. Forecasters are expecting broken clouds, thunderstorms and winds that could violate landing criteria around the time of both Friday landing opportunities. The first landing option is at 9:00 a.m. and the second is at 10:39 a.m.

Should mission managers wave off landing, the next four opportunities will be Saturday with two at Kennedy and two at Edwards Air Force Base in California. The opportunities at Kennedy are at 8:16 and 9:54 a.m. With a favorable California forecast, the opportunities there are at 9:46 and 11:24 a.m.

If mission managers feel the weather is improving in Florida today and decide to target the first opportunity, the crew will be given instructions to close Atlantis’ payload bay doors at 5:10 a.m., and the crew will begin suiting up at 6:28 a.m.

The next status report will be issued after landing today or at the end of the crew’s day if landing is waived off.

viernes, 22 de mayo de 2009

La NASA detalla los planes para las misiones robóticas de Exploración Lunar


http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LRO/main/index.html



At Astrotech Space Operations Facility in Titusville, Fla., NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, is being prepared for fairing installation. Credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller
http://snebulos.mit.edu/projects/crater/



El regreso de la NASA a la Luna recibirá un impulso en junio con el lanzamiento de dos satélites que retornarán una gran cantidad de datos sobre el vecino mas cercano a la Tierra.

NASA's Space Shuttle Landing Delayed by Weather

Katherine Trinidad
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1100
katherine.trinidad@nasa.gov

Candrea Thomas
Kennedy Space Center, Fla.
321-867-2468
candrea.k.thomas@nasa.gov


May 22, 2009

RELEASE : 09-118


NASA's Space Shuttle Landing Delayed by Weather


CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Space shuttle Atlantis and its crew will stay in space another day after bad weather prevented them from landing Friday at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

NASA Flight Director Norm Knight and the entry team will evaluate weather conditions at Kennedy before permitting Atlantis and its crew to land at 9:16 a.m. Saturday. A second Kennedy landing opportunity is at 10:54 a.m. The shuttle also has landing opportunities at Edwards Air Force Base in California at 10:46 a.m. and 12:24 p.m.

If Atlantis does not land Saturday, there are multiple landing opportunities Sunday at Kennedy, Edwards, or White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico. The Kennedy news center will open for landing activities. For recorded updated information about landing and news center hours, call 321-867-2525.

If the landing is diverted to Edwards, reporters should call the Dryden public affairs office at 661-276-3449. Dryden has limited facilities available for use by previously accredited journalists.

The landing times below are approximate and subject to change. All times are EDT:

Saturday Landing Opportunities
9:16 a.m. Orbit 180 landing at Kennedy (deorbit burn at 8:02 a.m.)
10:46 a.m. Orbit 181 landing at Edwards (deorbit burn at 9:29 a.m.)
10:54 a.m. Orbit 181 landing at Kennedy (deorbit burn at 9:46 a.m.)
12:24 p.m. Orbit 182 landing at Edwards (deorbit burn at 11:12 a.m.)

Sunday Landing Opportunities
10:01 a.m. Orbit 196 landing at Edwards (deorbit burn at 8:42 a.m.)
10:04 a.m. Orbit 196 landing at White Sands (deorbit burn at 8:46 a.m.)
10:10 a.m. Orbit 196 landing at Kennedy (deorbit burn at 8:57 a.m.)
11:39 a.m. Orbit 197 landing at Edwards (deorbit burn at 10:24 a.m.)
11:42 a.m. Orbit 197 landing at White Sands (deorbit burn at 10:29 a.m.)
11:48 a.m. Orbit 197 landing at Kennedy (deorbit burn at 10:42 a.m.)

The NASA News Twitter feed is updated throughout the shuttle mission and landing. To access the NASA News feed and other agency Twitter feeds, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/collaborate


For NASA TV downlink information, schedules and links to streaming video, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/ntv


For the latest information about the STS-125 mission and accomplishments, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle


For information about Hubble, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/hubble

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-21

5 p.m. CDT Thursday, May 21, 2009

Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

05.21.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-21

STS-125 MCC Status Report #21


As Atlantis’ crew prepares for landing Friday, mission managers are closely monitoring a low pressure system that has brought 16 inches of rain in three days to the Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Forecasters report the system is slowly moving away but it could still bring more rain, possible thunderstorms and winds that could violate the shuttle’s flight rules into the Florida spaceport area. The two Friday landing opportunities are at 9:00 and 10:39 a.m. CDT.

Should mission managers wave off landing the next four opportunities will be Saturday with two at Kennedy and two at Edwards Air Force Base in California. The opportunities at Kennedy are at 8:16 and 9:54 a.m. With a favorable California forecast, the opportunities there are at 9:46 and 11:24 a.m.

In another first for spaceflight, the STS-125 crew testified before the Senate Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agencies, chaired by Senator Barbara Mikulski of Maryland. She, and former astronaut Sen. Bill Nelson of Florida, talked with the crew.

The STS-125 crew is the first to testify live from space in a Senate hearing. Astronaut John Phillips gave the first congressional testimony live from space on June 14, 2005, during Expedition 11, when he testified before the House Science Committee, Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics.

The crew also talked with reporters from ABC, FOX, CBS, NBC and CNN.

In preparation for landing, Atlantis’ crew tested the ship’s flight control surfaces and reaction control system thrusters. Both systems functioned well and are ready to support entry activities.

Tomorrow, the crew should begin deorbit preparations at 3:50 a.m. and close the payload bay doors at 5:10 a.m. Here are predicted times for tomorrow and Saturday’s landing opportunities (all CDT):

ORBIT SITE D/O BURN LANDING

FRIDAY 165 KSC 7:49:16 a.m. 9:00:31 a.m.
166 KSC 9:33:41 a.m. 10:39:18 a.m.

SATURDAY 180 KSC 7:02 a.m. 8:16 a.m.
181 EDW 8:29 a.m. 9:46 a.m.
181 KSC 8:46 a.m. 9:54 a.m.
182 KSC 10:12 a.m. 11:24 a.m.


The crew is due to go to sleep at 5:01 p.m. and will wake at 1:01 a.m. to begin the procedures for landing. The next status report will be issued at the beginning of the crew’s day or earlier if events warrant.

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-20

2:30 a.m. CDT Thursday, May 21, 2009

Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

05.21.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-20

STS-125 MCC Status Report #20


The crew of Atlantis will spend the day preparing the shuttle for tomorrow’s return home. The crew woke up this morning at 2:04 a.m. CDT to “Cantina Band,” one of composer John Williams’ songs from the soundtrack to “Star Wars.” The song was played for the entire crew.

Commander Scott Altman, Pilot Greg Johnson and Mission Specialist Megan McArthur will check out the flight control surfaces of Atlantis, including the rudder and the wing flaps at 5:11 a.m. Those surfaces will guide the shuttle’s unpowered flight through the atmosphere to a landing. Immediately afterward, at 6:21 a.m., the astronauts will test fire Atlantis’ reaction control system thrusters. The thrusters will control the shuttle’s orientation as it descends and begins its re-entry through the atmosphere.

Mission Specialists Mike Good, John Grunsfeld, Mike Massimino and Drew Feustel will begin stowing away everything inside Atlantis and preparing the shuttle for the return trip. Landing is targeted for 9:01 a.m. tomorrow at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

After lunch, the crew will talk with Senator Barbara Mikulski and other members of the U.S. Senate at 11:31 a.m. At 1:41 p.m., the crew will talk with reporters from ABC, FOX, CBS, NBC and CNN.

The crew is due to go to sleep at 5:01 p.m. and will wake at 1:01 a.m. to begin the procedures for landing. The next status report will be issued at the end of the crew’s day or earlier if events warrant.

jueves, 21 de mayo de 2009

Invitación al Video Foro: "El Mito del Alunizaje"






Apreciados Amigos de la Astronomía y de las Ciencias Espaciales; reciban un cordial saludo!!!!!


Este sábado 23 de Mayo de 2009, tendremos EL Video Foro de la Sociedad Julio Garavito para el Estudio de la Astronomía Titulado : "EL MITO DEL ALUNIZAJE"
>
Por: SOCIEDAD JULIO GARAVITO.


Una de las fotografias que tanto da que hablar...

Este es un documental que tenía ganas de ver, pues bién, en Cazadores de mitos ponen a prueba algunas de esas teorias de conspiración que afirman que nunca se llego a la luna, como la famosa banderita y las fotos.

Se que no han profundizado en todas las teorias que hay, pero han desmentido las mas conocidas, aunque sólo analizaron dos fotografias y todos nos hemos quedado con ganas de más.


A pesar de que la teoria de conspiración se cae por si sola, los apoloescépticos seguiran negando que el hombre si llego a la luna, mirad en los comentarios de los videos, que seguro que ya hay alguno escéptico comentando.

http://laguerrasintregua.blogspot.com/2008/10/cazadores-de-mitos-alunizaje-en-la-luna.html





Día: Sábado 23 de Mayo de 2009

Hora: 10 AM
Lugar: Planetario de Medellín - Campus Planetario-ITM. Cuarto Piso: Biblioteca
Invita:



Entrada Libre, sin ningún costo.


Nos vemos el Sábado.

Un cordial saludo:

Campo Elías Roldán.
Director Sociedad Julio Garavito para el Estudio de la Astronomía
Medellín-Antioquia
COLOMBIA.

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-19

5 p.m. CDT Wednesday, May 20, 2009
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas
05.20.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-19

STS-125 MCC Status Report #19


The space shuttle Atlantis crew enjoyed a day off, answered reporters’ questions and chatted with colleagues on the International Space Station today. They’ll switch gears on Thursday and get ready for landing.

Commander Scott Altman, Pilot Greg Johnson and Mission Specialists Michael Good, Megan McArthur, John Grunsfeld, Mike Massimino and Andrew Feustel fielded questions for about 40 minutes from reporters at NASA centers before lunch.

After lunch, the crew had a chance to talk with Expedition 19 Commander Gennady Padalka and Flight Engineers Mike Barratt and Koichi Wakata on the International Space Station during a ship-to-ship call as the two vehicles circled the Earth in different orbits. Later in the day, the station crew toasted the first use of the station’s new water recycling system with fellow astronauts, engineers, flight controllers and program officials on the ground.

The Hubble Space Telescope servicing crew will turn their attention to landing tomorrow, stowing gear that has been used over the course of 10 days in orbit and five spacewalks. They’ll also check the reaction control system thrusters and flight control systems that will be used to control their reentry and descent through the atmosphere.

Mission managers completed their review of the late inspection of the shuttle’s wing leading edge and nosecap heat shield, and cleared the entire thermal protection system for safe entry. Landing is scheduled for 9:01 a.m. CDT Friday at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, weather permitting.

The crew is due to go to sleep at 6:01 p.m. The next status report will be issued after the crew awakens at 2:01 a.m., or earlier if events warrant.

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-18

3:30 a.m. CDT Wednesday, May 20, 2009
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

05.20.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-18
STS-125 MCC Status Report #18


As the voyage of the space shuttle Atlantis boldly continued this morning, the crew woke up at 3:03 a.m. CDT to the theme from the television series “Star Trek,” which was composed by Alexander Courage. The song was played for the entire crew.

At 9:26 a.m., the crew will talk with members of the media at different NASA centers about the mission, the Hubble Telescope and the crew’s thoughts on being a part of this fifth and final servicing mission.

At 11:06 a.m., the crew will make a ship-to-ship call to their orbital neighbors, the crew of Expedition 19 on board the International Space Station.

The crew will spend the balance of the day enjoying some off duty time as they prepare for Friday’s entry and landing.

The crew is due to go to sleep at 6:01 p.m. The next status report will be issued at the end of the crew’s day or earlier if events warrant.

ATERIRIZAJE MAÑANA VIERNES TRANSBORDADOR ATLANTIS POR TELEMEDELLIN

SEGUIMIENTO EN VIVO
Aterrizaje
STS 125: Atlantis



Mañana viernes 22 de mayo, el Transbordador Espacial Atlantis estará tocando pista a eso de las 9:00 am en el Centro Espacial Kennedy después de una exitosa misión de servicio al Telescopio Hubble.

Estaremos transmitiendo por Telemedellín desde el Parque Explora a partir de las 8:00 am.

Aún no sabemos si va a haber entrada al Parque para el público, eso lo confirmamos en un correo esta noche. Si no hay entrada, de todas formas lo pueden ver por Telemedellín.


JULIÁN MAURICIO ARENAS
DAVID ALEJANDRO PINEDA

miércoles, 20 de mayo de 2009

NASA prueba los paracaidas del Cohete Ares I










NASA and ATK test engineers at the US Army's Yuma Proving Ground prepare for the first test of all three Ares I main parachutes. Image Credit: U.S. Army Yuma Proving Grounds
http://www.flickr.com/photos/28634332@N05/sets/72157618527184846/show/


Los ingenieros de la NASA y la industria exitosamente completaron la primera prueba de los tres principales paracaidas del cohete Ares I este miércoles.

http://www.nasa.gov/constellation

Un estudio de la NASA muestra que los Asteroides podrían haber acelerado la Vida en la Tierra


http://astrobiology.nasa.gov/


Un estudio financiado por la NASA indica que un intenso bombardeo de asteroides hace cerca de 4 millones de años puede no haber esterilizado la Tierra primitiva tan intensamente como se había pensado anteriormente.
http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2009/may/HQ_09-111_Asteroids_Life_on_Earth.html

Preparación para observar el Universo



El sistema manipulador remoto del transbordador espacial Atlantis levanta el Telescopio Espacial Hubble de la bahía de carga y es el momento de la liberación del observatorio orbital para iniciarlo en su camino de vuelta a casa para observar el universo, en esta imagen tomada el 19 de mayo de 2009.

Image Credit: NASA
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1365.html

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-17

5 p.m. CDT Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

05.19.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-17

STS-125 MCC Status Report #17


The crew of Atlantis bid farewell to the Hubble Space Telescope on behalf of NASA and the rest of the world today. The telescope was released back into space at 7:57 a.m. CDT. With its upgrades, the telescope should be able to see farther into the universe than ever before.

Astronaut Megan McArthur used the shuttle’s robotic arm to grab Hubble, lift it out of Atlantis’ payload bay and release it. Ground teams opened Hubble’s aperture door, which is the large shutter that protects the telescope’s primary and secondary mirrors.

Atlantis performed a final separation maneuver from the telescope at 8:28 a.m., which took the shuttle out of the vicinity of Hubble. The berthing mechanism to which Hubble has been attached during the mission was stored back down into the payload bay.

The rest of the day was focused on the scheduled inspection of Atlantis’ heat shield, searching for any potential damage from orbital debris. The crew used the shuttle robotic arm to operate the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) for the inspection. The crew worked ahead of schedule and returned the OBSS to the payload bay sill today instead of tomorrow.

The crew’s sleep period is scheduled to begin at 7:31 p.m., although the crew will try to go to sleep 30 minutes early to help adjust for an earlier workday for the rest of the mission. The adjusted schedule allows the entry flight control team to consider an earlier landing opportunity at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Friday before the sea breeze adversely affects landing weather conditions later in the day.

The crew is due to wake up tomorrow at 3:01 a.m. for an off-duty day. The next status report will be issued at the beginning of the crew’s day or earlier if events warrant.

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-16

4 a.m. CDT Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

05.19.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-16
STS-125 MCC Status Report #16


The crew of Atlantis will bid farewell to the Hubble Space Telescope today. Atlantis’ crew woke up this morning at 3:31 a.m. CDT to “Lie in Our Graves” performed by the Dave Matthews Band. It was played for Mission Specialist Megan McArthur.

McArthur will operate the shuttle’s robotic arm today as she reaches out and grapples onto the telescope. She will then lift Hubble out of Atlantis’ payload bay and move it over the edge of the shuttle. Ground teams will command Hubble’s aperture door to open, which is the large shutter that protects the telescope’s primary and secondary mirrors. Final release of Hubble is scheduled for 7:53 a.m.

Atlantis will perform a final separation maneuver from the telescope at 8:29 a.m., which will take the shuttle out of the vicinity of Hubble. The berthing mechanism to which Hubble has been attached during the mission will then be stored back down into the payload bay.

The crew also will use the robotic arm to unberth the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) and will use it to perform a scheduled inspection of Atlantis’ heat shield to make sure that it remains in good shape for entry.

The crew’s sleep period will begin at 7:31 p.m. CDT, and the crew is due to wake up tomorrow at 3:31 a.m. The next status report will be issued at the end of the crew’s day or earlier if events warrant.

martes, 19 de mayo de 2009

Cosmología en la Bolivariana.

El próximo viernes en la Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Auditorio Juan Pablo II en la Facultad de Arquitectura, el padre Manuel Carreira, del Observatorio Vaticano, dará una conferencia sobre Astronomía y Cosmología, a las 9:30 AM . La entrada es libre.
Los invitamos a todos.
Se adjunta una pequeña reseña hitórica publicada en la Circular de la RAC por Asafi y la Escuela de Astronomíade Cali.
Favor divulgar esta invitación.
Saludos.
William.




Dr. Manuel Carreira, S.J.
http://www.ucu.edu.uy/lazosdigital/Ano02no30.htm


Nacido en Galicia, Manuel Carreira vive desde 1957 en Estados Unidos, donde esprofesor de Física y Filosofía de la Naturaleza. Es Licenciado en Filosofía de la Universidad Pontificia Comillas, Madrid, España, Licenciado en Teología de Loyola University, Chicago, Estados Unidos, Master en Física de John Carroll University, Cleveland, Estados Unidos y Doctor en Física, The Catholic University of America,Washington, Estados Unidos, con una tesis sobre los Rayos Cósmicos, dirigida por el Dr. Clyde Cowan (co-descubridor del neutrino y Premio Nobel de Física).
Durante quince años ha sido miembro de la Junta Directiva del Observatorio Vaticano.
Además de investigar en astrofísica, trabajó en varios proyectos de desarrollo tecnológico en el área aero-espacial, financiados por la NASA.
El Padre Carreira es autor del libro “Ciencia y fe: ¿relaciones de complementareidad?”, donde se tratan varios temas que giran alrededor de una sola temática: la cosmologíacristiana a la luz del avance científico actual.

“Comisión Colombiana del Espacio”,


El motivo del mensaje es para invitar a toda la comunidad académica y educativa al próximo encuentro de Ciencia en Bicicleta: “Comisión Colombiana del Espacio”, el desarrollo de la ciencia y la tecnología espaciales en Colombia a cargo de: Iván Darío Gómez, director del Instituto Geográfico Agustín Codazi ; 6:30 p.m. Sala 3D.



Cupo limitado, entrada libre.


Tendremos, también, la presentación de la aerofotografía más grande de Medellín en la Sala Colombia Geodiversa a las 6:00 p.m.

El Rejuvenecido Hubble siendo liberado del Transbordador Espacial Atlantis


El observatorio orbital icónico de la Astronomía - el Telescopio Espacial Hubble - ha sido liberado por los astronautas del transbordador espacial Atlantis después de un servicio dramático de cinco Caminatas Espaciales que deberían permitirle a la nave espacial de seguir sondeando los misterios del Universo durante varios años más.

http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts125/090519fd9/index2.html

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-14

5 a.m. CDT Monday, May 18, 2009

Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

05.18.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-14

STS-125 MCC Status Report #14


As Atlantis’ crew begins their eighth day in space, astronauts Drew Feustel and John Grunsfeld are hours away from conducting the final spacewalk on the Hubble Space Telescope. The STS-125 crew awoke this morning to “Sound of Your Voice” performed by Barenaked Ladies. It was played for Commander Scott Altman.

There are two major focuses for today’s spacewalk. The first objective for Feustel and Grunsfeld is the removal of the battery module from Bay 3 on the telescope and the installation of a fresh module. Each battery module weighs 460 pounds and contains three batteries. Each of the nickel hydrogen batteries weighs 125 pounds, and they provide power to the telescope when it passes into orbital night and the solar arrays are not exposed to the sun. All of the batteries on Hubble are original equipment, and they were only designed to operate for five years. The batteries in Bay 2 were replaced earlier in the mission.

The second task is the removal and replacement of Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) 2. Hubble has three of these sensors, and FGS 2 has degraded over time. The three sensors are parked at 90 degree angles around the circumference of the telescope, and two are used to point and lock the telescope on its targets. The third can be used for astrometry, which is measuring the distances between different celestial objects. The refurbished FGS that will be installed today previously had been removed and returned on the third servicing mission in December 1999. It has since been enhanced and upgraded.

After these two tasks are accomplished, Feustel and Grunsfeld will turn their attention to the New Outer Blanket Layer (NOBL) on the outside of the telescope’s Bay 5. The NOBL on Bay 8 was due to be installed during yesterday’s spacewalk, but the crew was unable to accomplish it during the spacewalk. If time permits, Feustel and Grunsfeld may be asked to install a partial or full set of NOBLs on Bay 8.The team in Mission Control will make the decision in real time based on the progress of the spacewalk.

The crew’s sleep period will begin at 7:31 p.m. CDT, and the crew is due to wake up tomorrow at 3:31 a.m. to begin procedures to release Hubble. The next status report will be issued at the end of the crew’s day or earlier if events warrant.

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-14

5 a.m. CDT Monday, May 18, 2009

Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

05.18.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-14

STS-125 MCC Status Report #14


As Atlantis’ crew begins their eighth day in space, astronauts Drew Feustel and John Grunsfeld are hours away from conducting the final spacewalk on the Hubble Space Telescope. The STS-125 crew awoke this morning to “Sound of Your Voice” performed by Barenaked Ladies. It was played for Commander Scott Altman.

There are two major focuses for today’s spacewalk. The first objective for Feustel and Grunsfeld is the removal of the battery module from Bay 3 on the telescope and the installation of a fresh module. Each battery module weighs 460 pounds and contains three batteries. Each of the nickel hydrogen batteries weighs 125 pounds, and they provide power to the telescope when it passes into orbital night and the solar arrays are not exposed to the sun. All of the batteries on Hubble are original equipment, and they were only designed to operate for five years. The batteries in Bay 2 were replaced earlier in the mission.

The second task is the removal and replacement of Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) 2. Hubble has three of these sensors, and FGS 2 has degraded over time. The three sensors are parked at 90 degree angles around the circumference of the telescope, and two are used to point and lock the telescope on its targets. The third can be used for astrometry, which is measuring the distances between different celestial objects. The refurbished FGS that will be installed today previously had been removed and returned on the third servicing mission in December 1999. It has since been enhanced and upgraded.

After these two tasks are accomplished, Feustel and Grunsfeld will turn their attention to the New Outer Blanket Layer (NOBL) on the outside of the telescope’s Bay 5. The NOBL on Bay 8 was due to be installed during yesterday’s spacewalk, but the crew was unable to accomplish it during the spacewalk. If time permits, Feustel and Grunsfeld may be asked to install a partial or full set of NOBLs on Bay 8.The team in Mission Control will make the decision in real time based on the progress of the spacewalk.

The crew’s sleep period will begin at 7:31 p.m. CDT, and the crew is due to wake up tomorrow at 3:31 a.m. to begin procedures to release Hubble. The next status report will be issued at the end of the crew’s day or earlier if events warrant.

lunes, 18 de mayo de 2009

NASA selecciona 21 proyecto tecnológicos para Pruebas de Vuelo en Gravedad Reducida


http://ipp.nasa.gov/ii_fast.htm

La NASA ha seleccionado 21 proyectos de demostración tecnológica para volar en los vuelos del avión de gravedad reducida durante la semana del 10 de agosto a través de su Acceso Facilitado al Medio Ambiente Espacial para el Desarrollo de Tecnología y el Programa de Formación conocido como FAST (Facilitated Access to the Space Environment for Technology Development and Training)
http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2009/may/HQ_09-109_FAST_IPP_Awards.html

Encima de la Tierra



Con la mayor parte del Planeta Tierra oscurecido detrás de él, el astronauta Michael Good conduce el brazo del sistema manipulador remoto del Atlantis a la posición exacta en la que él necesita estar para continuar el trabajo en el Telescopio Espacial Hubble en la cuarta caminata espacial de la misión STS-125 el 17 de mayo de 2009.

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1360.html

La Reparación del Hubble



Los astronautas Michael Good (bajo) y Mike Massimino participan en la cuarta caminata espacial de la misión STS-125 el 17 de mayo de 2009, como continuación de los trabajos para renovar y mejorar el telescopio espacial Hubble. Durante más de 8 horas de trabajo, Massimino y Good realizaron reparaciones y mejoras en el Espectrógrafo de Imágenes del Telescopio Espacial que extenderá la vida de Hubble en la próxima década.

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1361.html

Los Astronautas del Atlantis Toman la Ultima Caminata Espacial para Trabajar en el Hubble



Los astronautas del Atlantis están realizando su quinta y última caminata espacial de hoy, una excursión de seis horas por John y Drew Grunsfeld Feustel para equipar al Hubble con una segunda de tres unidades de baterías de energía, un sensor de orientación fina renovado y páneles aislantes nuevos en la bahía de equipos. Se espera que sea la última vez que los astronautas toquen el telescopio espacial.

http://spaceflightnow.com/

Invitación a la Conferencia de la Comision Colombiana del Espacio en el Parque Explora

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-13

7:30 p.m. CDT Sunday, May 17, 2009
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

05.17.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-13

STS-125 MCC Status Report #13


In the sixth longest spacewalk in history, Astronauts Mike Massimino and Michael Good tackled the intricate task of removing and capturing 111 screws to be able to revive the Hubble Space Telescope’s two-dimensional spectroscopy capability.

In the 8 hour, 2 minute spacewalk, Massimino and Good repaired the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) by replacing a power supply board. STIS, installed on the Hubble Space Telescope in 1997, stopped working in August 2004 due to a power supply failure and was in a “safe mode.”

Though the removal of the many screws was expected to be difficult, a handrail gave Good and Massimino trouble. The handrail was obstructing the path of a fastener capture plate and one stripped bolt prevented it from coming free. Massimino followed steps developed quickly at the Goddard Spaceflight Center to carefully bend and break the handrail free so that the fastener capture plate could be installed. At about three hours into the spacewalk, Massimino broke the handrail free allowing the spacewalkers to proceed with the day’s tasks.

The initial aliveness test reported the STIS as working properly. The initial functional test was ended when the telescope put itself into “safe mode,” having reached a low thermal limit. The STIS is believed to be in good shape. Ground controllers will start the functional tests over again, once the telescope reaches a good temperature.

The STIS separates light into its component colors to reveal information about the chemical content, temperature and motion of planets, comets, stars, interstellar gas and galaxies. The information it can provide will help scientists better understand the physical properties of the material universe – putting the physics in astrophysics.

Massimino and Good were unable to get to the installation of the New Outer Blanket Layer (NOBL) on the outside of the telescope’s bay 8. Mission managers have asked Mission Specialists John Grunsfeld and Andrew Fuestel to add the installation of a partial set of blankets on bay 8 during Monday’s spacewalk. If time permits, the two may get to install the full set.

The crew’s sleep period will begin at 8:31 p.m. CDT, and the crew is due to wake up tomorrow at 4:31 a.m. to conduct the fifth and final spacewalk of the mission. The next status report will be issued at the beginning of the crew’s day or earlier if events warrant.

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-12

5 a.m. CDT Sunday, May 17, 2009
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

05.17.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-12

STS-125 MCC Status Report #12


The crew of Atlantis is preparing for the fourth spacewalk of the mission, which will begin today at 8:16 a.m. CDT. The crew awoke at 4:31 a.m. to “New York State of Mind” performed by Billy Joel. The song was played for Mission Specialist Mike Massimino.

Massimino and Mission Specialist Mike Good will focus on repairing the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) today. STIS was installed on the Hubble Space Telescope during the second servicing mission in 1997. STIS stopped functioning in August 2004 due to a power supply failure and is currently in a “safe mode.”

Just like on the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), Good and Massimino will overlay a fastener capture plate over the top of an access panel on the STIS. But this time, the astronauts will have to loosen 111 screws in order to remove the panel. Once repaired, the STIS will work in tandem with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph by allowing Hubble to see a full range spectrum. Each of the instruments will back each other up while offering unique capabilities to study black holes, stars and planets around other stars.

Massimino and Good also will install a New Outer Blanket Layer (NOBL) on the outside of bay 8 on the telescope. This is a stainless steel cover that protects the telescope from the extreme environment of space by providing thermal protection for the equipment bays. The existing insulation has degraded over time.

The crew’s sleep period will begin at 8:31 p.m., and the crew is due to wake up tomorrow at 4:31 a.m. and will conduct the fifth and final spacewalk of the mission. The next status report will be issued at the end of the crew’s day, or earlier if events warrant.

domingo, 17 de mayo de 2009

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-11

4 p.m. CDT Saturday, May 16, 2009
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

05.16.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-11

STS-125 MCC Status Report #11


Mission Specialists John Grunsfeld and Andrew Feustel completed the third spacewalk of Atlantis’ mission to the Hubble Space Telescope in 6 hours, 36 minutes, stepping smoothly through the difficult tasks of repairing a delicate camera and installing its most sensitive spectrograph ever.

Grunsfeld and Feustel began the spacewalk at 8:35 a.m., removing the telescope’s 16-year-old “contact lens,” the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR), and safely tucked it into the shuttle’s payload bay. The two then installed the new Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS), which will allow Hubble to peer farther into the universe than ever before in the near and far ultraviolet ranges.

Then, Grunsfeld and Feustel used specially designed tools to carry out a job never intended to be done on a spacewalk, repairing the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The camera, known for some of the most famous imagery captured by Hubble, had stopped working in early 2007 when its backup power supply short circuited. The two removed 32 screws from an access panel to efficiently replace the camera’s four circuit boards and install a new power supply.

In a test conducted from the Space Telescope Operations Control Center at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., engineers powered up the 851-pound COS to make sure its power and data connection were operating. While the astronauts sleep, the team will conduct additional functional tests on each component to determine if the astronauts will need to perform additional work. The COS will be calibrated over the next several weeks.

The spacewalk was the 80th in space shuttle history. Grunsfeld now ranks fourth among all spacewalkers, with 51 hours, 28 minutes to his credit over seven excursions.

Tomorrow, astronauts Michael Good and Mike Massimino will repair the Space Telescope Imaging and Spectrograph (STIS) and install the New Outer Blanket Layer (NOBL).

The crew’s sleep period will begin at 8:31 p.m. and crew wake will be at 4:31 a.m. tomorrow. The next status report will be issued tomorrow morning or earlier, if events warrant.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts125/news/STS-125-11.html

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-10

5 a.m. CDT Saturday, May 16, 2009
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

05.16.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-10


STS-125 MCC Status Report #10


Mission Specialists John Grunsfeld and Drew Feustel are preparing to begin the third spacewalk of Atlantis’ mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. The crew awoke this morning at 4:31 a.m. CDT to “Hotel Cepollina” performed by Fuzzbox Piranha. The song was played for Grunsfeld.

The first activity for today’s spacewalk is the removal of the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR) and the installation of the new Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). COSTAR has been on board Hubble since the first servicing mission in 1993. It has served as a sort of “contact lens” for Hubble and was designed to correct a problem with the telescope’s optics. The new COS will be the most sensitive spectrograph ever flown on Hubble and will examine large scale structures in the universe. The COS weighs 851 pounds and is the size of a phone booth.

The second major task for Grunsfeld and Feustel is the repair of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The ACS is one of Hubble’s primary cameras and was installed during the fourth servicing mission the telescope in 2002. It stopped working in early 2007 due to a short circuit in its backup power supply, but it has been responsible for some of the most famous imagery captured by Hubble. Grunsfeld and Feustel will focus on replacing some of the camera’s electronics, which will require them to remove 32 screws from an access panel. To accomplish this, the astronauts will use a custom made fastener capture plate that will lie over the top of the access panel and keep the screws from floating away.

Once complete, the entire crew will review the procedures for tomorrow’s spacewalk, which will be conducted by Mike Good and Mike Massimino.

The crew’s sleep period will begin at 8:31 p.m. and crew wake will be at 4:31 a.m. tomorrow. The next status report will be issued at the end of the crew’s day or earlier, if events warrant.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts125/news/STS-125-10.html

sábado, 16 de mayo de 2009

Cronología de la Cohetería y el Vuelo Espacial- Agosto de 1958: Se Evalúan Propuestas por Ingenieros y Científicos en la URSS para el Vuelo Espacial

Por: Campo Elías RoldáN (CERN)
E-mail: campoelias.roldan@gmail.com
Ingeniero Mecánico
Universidad de Antioquia
Coordinador Científico y Técnico
Inges Aerospace-Incaes Aerospace
Número de teléfono celular:(+574)3158094336




Varias propuestas de varias oficinas de diseño en la Unión Soviética eran evaluadas por una plana mayor de Científicos e Ingenieros de mayor experiencia para el vuelo espacial tripulado y no tripulado. Para noviembre de 1958 se había tomado la decisión de proceder con el diseño de una nave espacial tripulada llamada VOSTOK a expensas de los sofisticados satélite no tripulados. Los detalles iniciales de diseño de la nave Espacial Vostok serían terminados en marzo de 1959.


http://www.aerospaceweb.org/question/conspiracy/q0235.shtml




Esquema de una nave Vostok, como la que supuestamente habría enviado a Iliushin al espacio.
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astronautas_fantasma

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vostok_1

El valor del vuelo espacial para la demostración de la proeza tecnológica no estaba perdida en las jerarquías soviéticas. Mientras los satélites no tripulados para la vigilancia militar y la exploración Científica del Espacio se le daba la aprobación, la atención en corto plazo era colocar un hombre en el espacio y en el desarrollo de sondas espaciales para le exploración de Venus y Marte. Por esta razón, es sino hasta marzo de 1962 la unión Soviética lanzaría otro satélite científico.

Mecánicos en Orbita!!!



Manos a la Obra

El astronauta Andrew Feustel de la STS-125 selecciona su próximo herramienta a utilizar durante su participación en la primera de los cinco caminatas espaciales programadas, para llevar a cabo el servicio final al Telescopio Espacial Hubble. Feustel y el veterano astronauta John Grunsfeld (fuera del enfoque) están programados para participar en tres de las caminatas espaciales.

Image Credit: NASA

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1356.html

La Vista


El astronauta Michael Good fisgonea a través de una de las ventanas hacia el interior de la cabina de la tripulación del Atlantis, donde sus miembros del equipo de soporte en mangas de camisa se ocupan ellos mismos en asisitir la segunda caminata de cinco caminatas espaciales para realizar trabajo sobre el Telescopio Espacial Hubble. El Astronauta Mike Massimino se puede ver en el fondo en el trabajo al lado del puerto de la bahía de carga del transbordador.

Image Credit: NASA

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-09

5 p.m. CDT Friday, May 15, 2009
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

05.15.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-09


STS-125 MCC Status Report #09 Mission Specialists Michael Good and Mike Massimino spun up the Hubble Space Telescope with six new gyroscopes and a new battery during a 7-hour, 56-minute spacewalk. Friday’s was the eighth longest spacewalk in history.

The second of the mission’s five spacewalks began at 7:49 a.m. CDT, and by 3:15 p.m. the team had accomplished all of the planned objectives. Those included replacement of all three rate sensing units (RSUs). Each rate sensing unit contains two gyroscopes, which help the telescope point itself. The spacewalkers couldn’t get one of the three units into its slot, but they were able to install a spare that was carried on board because of the tight tolerances involved.

Good and Massimino removed one of the original battery modules from Bay 2 of the telescope and replaced it with a new unit. The module in Bay 3 is scheduled to be replaced by Mission Specialists John Grunsfeld and Andrew Feustel on Monday. The batteries provide power to the telescope when it passes into the Earth’s shadow and its solar arrays are not exposed to the sun.

Ground controllers at the Space Telescope Operations Control Center at Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland confirmed that all six gyroscopes and the new battery passed preliminary tests.

Commander Scott Altman and Mission Specialist Megan McArthur completed a robotic arm inspection of 40 shuttle heat shield tiles that weren’t in full view during Tuesday’s inspection. Based on imagery analysis, mission managers cleared all of Atlantis’ thermal protection systems until a final pre-landing inspection on Tuesday.

The last item on today’s schedule for the crew is the review of the procedures for tomorrow’s spacewalk, the third of the mission. That spacewalk will see Grunsfeld and Feustel install a new Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and Advanced Camera for Surveys.

Because Friday's spacewalk was longer than planned, the crew will go to bed an hour later at 8:31 p.m. and awaken an hour later at 4:31 a.m. Saturday. The next status report will be issued after the start of the crew’s next day on orbit, or earlier if events warrant.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts125/news/STS-125-09.html

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-08

4 a.m. CDT Thursday, May 15, 2009
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas


05.15.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-08

STS-125 MCC Status Report #08

Mission Specialists Mike Good and Mike Massimino will venture outside shuttle Atlantis today to complete the second of the mission’s five spacewalks. The crew awoke this morning at 3:31 a.m. CDT to “God of Wonders.” It was played for Good.

Today’s spacewalk will begin at 7:16 a.m. and is scheduled to last 6.5 hours. The first major task will be the replacement of all three of Hubble’s rate sensing units (RSUs). Each rate sensing unit contains two gyroscopes, which help the telescope point itself. The telescope is designed to operate on three of the six gyros, but today’s spacewalk will give Hubble all new units.

The second major task will be the replacement of the battery module in Bay 2 of the telescope. Each battery module weighs 460 pounds and contains three batteries. Each of the nickel hydrogen batteries weighs 125 pounds, and they provide power to the telescope when it passes into the night sky and the solar arrays are not exposed to the sun. All of the batteries on Hubble are original equipment, and they were only designed to operate for five years. The STS-125 crew also will install new batteries in Bay 3 of Hubble during the mission’s fifth and final spacewalk.

Commander Scott Altman and Mission Specialist Megan McArthur will perform an inspection of some of the shuttle’s heat shield tiles using the robotic arm. The teams on the ground weren’t able to get a full view of the tiles during Tuesday’s inspection. There are 40 tiles the crew will be examining, and those images will be downlinked to the teams in Houston for analysis. Today’s inspection is expected to take 45 minutes.

The last item on today’s schedule for the crew is the review of the procedures for tomorrow’s spacewalk, the third of the mission.

The crew will enter its sleep period at 7:31 p.m. and will awake at 3:31 a.m. The next status report will be issued at the end of the crew’s day or earlier if events warrant.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts125/news/STS-125-08.html

viernes, 15 de mayo de 2009

Una semana de trabajo





El astronauta John Grunsfeld realiza un trabajo sobre el Telescopio Espacial Hubble como la primera de los cinco caminatas espaciales STS-125 que inicia una semana de trabajos en el observatorio orbital. Grunsfeld, un veterano de las caminatas espaciales quién previamente había trabajado en el telescopio, participará en dos de las cuatro restantes sesiones de actividad extravehicular en la misión.

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_Feature_1355.html

Transitando el Sol



En esta imagen recortada, el transbordador espacial Atlantis de la NASA se ve en silueta durante un tránsito solar, el martes 12 de mayo de 2009, desde la Florida. Esta imagen se hizo antes de que el Atlantis y la tripulación del STS-125 hubiesen capturado el Telescopio Espacial Hubble.

El fotógrafo tomó esta imagen a través de un telescopio reflactor Takahshi de 5 pulgadas con filtro y una cámara digital Canon 5D Mark II

Image Credit: NASA / Thierry Legault


http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1354.html

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-07

5 p.m. CDT Thursday, May 14, 2009
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas
05.14.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-07
STS-125 MCC Status Report #07


The Hubble Space Telescope can now see farther into space and across a wider spectrum of colors, thanks to the work done during the first spacewalk of the STS-125 mission.

Mission Specialists John Grunsfeld and Andrew Feustel spent 7 hours and 20 minutes in space shuttle Atlantis’ cargo bay, installing the new Wide Field Camera 3 and replacing the telescope’s Science Instrument Command and Data Handling Unit, or SIC&DH.

The new camera will allow Hubble to take large-scale, extremely clear and detailed photos over a wider range of colors than the camera they removed. After it was installed, ground controllers at the Space Telescope Operations Control Center at Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland confirmed that WFC3 was receiving power as expected.

The SIC&DH is a computer that sends commands to Hubble’s science instruments and formats science data for transmission to the ground. One side of the previous SIC&DH failed in September just before STS-125 was originally scheduled to launch. The mission was postponed to give teams on the ground time to prepare a replacement and train the crew for the task. Though the telescope was able to continue, this replacement restored redundancy.

Grunsfeld also installed a mechanism that will allow future spacecraft to capture the telescope, and Feustel installed two of three Latch Over Center Kits, or LOCK, that will make opening and closing Hubble’s large access doors easier on the remaining spacewalks. An aft shroud latch repair was installed on the middle LOCK.

Before coming in, the spacewalkers configured a platform they installed on the shuttle’s robotic arm to clear the view for a Friday inspection of some shuttle heat shield tiles using the orbiter boom sensor system. The teams on the ground weren’t able to get a full view of the tiles during Tuesday’s inspection. The crew will perform that inspection before Friday’s spacewalk begins.

The crew will enter its sleep period at 7:31 p.m. and will awake at 3:31 a.m. to begin preparations for the second spacewalk of the mission, scheduled to begin at 7:16 a.m. The next status report will be issued at the end of the crew’s day or earlier if events warrant.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts125/news/STS-125-07.html

STATUS REPORT : STS-125-06

4 a.m. CDT Thursday, May 14, 2009
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas
05.14.09 STATUS REPORT : STS-125-06


STS-125 MCC Status Report #06 Mission Specialists John Grunsfeld and Drew Feustel are now just hours away from beginning the first of five spacewalks of Atlantis’ mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. The crew awoke this morning to “Stickshifts and Safetybelts” performed by Cake. It was played for Feustel.

Today’s spacewalk is set to begin at 7:16 a.m. CDT and will last 6.5 hours. Grunsfeld will be the first astronaut to exit the shuttle’s air lock and will begin preparations in Atlantis’ payload bay. Feustel will exit a few minutes later and will make his way onto Atlantis’ robotic arm. Mission Specialist Megan McArthur will operate the arm while Feustel performs his activities outside the shuttle.

The first task for Grunsfeld and Feustel is the removal of the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 and the installation of Wide Field Camera 3. The new camera weighs almost 900 pounds and measures 2 feet tall by 6 feet wide by 7 feet long. It will be Hubble’s first panchromatic camera and will allow astronomers to observe galaxy evolution, dark matter and dark energy.

The next task is to replace the Science Instrument Command and Data Handling Unit (SCI&DH) with a ground spare. The SCI&DH allows Hubble’s science instruments to send and receive data, and it experienced a failure in September of last year. Commanding was switched over to the unit’s back-up channel, but the new SCI&DH will restore full redundancy.

Feustel and Grunsfeld also will install the Soft Capture Mechanism (SCM) on the bottom of the telescope. This will allow future spacecraft to rendezvous and berth with the telescope.

The final task of the spacewalk will be the installation of three Latch Over Center Kits (LOCKS). This will make it easier on the mission’s other spacewalks for the astronauts to open and close Hubble’s large access doors. At the end of the day, the entire crew will review procedures for the mission’s second spacewalk, which will be conducted by Mike Good and Mike Massimino tomorrow.

The crew will enter its sleep period at 7:31 p.m. and will awake at 3:31 a.m. The next status report will be issued at the end of the crew’s day or earlier, if events warrant.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts125/news/STS-125-06.html



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SOÑADORAS O CIENTÍFICAS, EXPERIMÉNTELO EN MALOKA

Usted es nuestro invitado de honor de un encuentro único en su género.





Lunes 18 de mayo





CHARLA
LAS MUJERES Y SU APORTE A LA ASTRONOMÍA Y A LA CIENCIA

(Astronomía)
5 p.m. a 7 p.m.
Lugar: Maloka


Presenta: Dr. José Antonio Mesa, Presidente de la Asociación Colombiana de Estudios Astronómicos (ACDEA)







Los esperamos y no deje de compartir esta información con amigos y familiares.

Reciba mis sentimientos de aprecio y amistad.


Para mayor información sobre nuestro festival, los invitamos a visitar nuestra web Maloka:

http://www.maloka.org/festival/



--
Jeannette González
Auxiliar Especializado de Mercados
MALOKA
4272707 Ext 1826

jueves, 14 de mayo de 2009

NASA invita a los reporteros para ver la llegado del Módulo Tranquildad de la ISS


http://www.microsiervos.com/archivo/ciencia/nodo-3-iss-se-llamara-tranquility.html



Los reporteros han sido invitados para ver la llegada de la nueva sección de la Estación Espacial Internacional, el módulo de la Tranquilidad, en el Centro Espacial Kennedy de NASA el miércoles, 20 de mayo.
http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2009/may/HQ_M09-085_Tranquility_Module_KSC.html

El HUBBLE


http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1353.html


El Telescopio Espacial Hubble se levanta en la bahía de carga del Transbordador Espacial Atlantis después de su captura el miércoles, 13 de mayo de 2009. La misión STS-125 comenzó una serie de Caminatas Espaciales al día siguiente para el servicio del Hubble. Más de 11 días y cinco Caminatas Espaciales, la tripulación del Atlantis hará reparaciones y mejoras en el telescopio, dejándolo mejor que nunca y listo para otros cinco años - o más - de investigación.

La NASA asigna la Tripulación de la Misión del Transbordador STS-132

La NASA ha asignado la tripulación para la misión del transbordador espacial STS-132, prevista para el lanzamiento en abril de 2010. Este vuelo llevará el Mini Módulo de Investigación construido por los rusos (MRM1) a la Estación Espacial Internacional.
http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2009/may/HQ_09-105_STS-132_Crew.html






http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/hyperbola/Russian%20MRM1%20A.JPG




http://images.spaceref.com/news/2009/MRM1_iso.m.jpg